I have arthrosis in my knee and a little bit in the hips, can I still do spinning? I’ve been doing it for years.

– Din

Mark Chen, Physiotherapist

The advantage of spinning is that it is not a weight-bearing activity (except the standing parts, of course). That makes it a ‘safer’ option than, for example, running, where your knees and hips have to endure huge impact for miles. So if you look at it purely from a mechanical-stressn perspective, it should be no problem at all.

You indicate that you have been doing spinning for years. Could it be that the number of years and intensity have contributed to the current condition of the knee? Ultimately, it is, of course, a one-sided and repetitive form of sport. For example, do you clearly have more pain immediately after spinning, or the morning after? In that case, you should question how good spinning is for your body.

I am personally a fan of variety, not only because I like to do different things but also not to burden my body too much with one element. I also recommend this to the majority of my clients. Ask yourself the above questions and if spinning does indeed cause problems for you, then consider reducing or varying with a different sport.

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