“Since a month I have had pain in my lower back. Also occasionally in my right buttock and when sitting. I regularly use a heat patch on those spots and a broad back strap, which relieves the pain slightly so that I can keep moving. If I sit too long, walking is painful afterward. This is due to my age, I am 65 years old. I also regularly have sensations in my legs when I sit too long, after about two hours. After ten minutes of walking or standing for too long, my right leg hurts. Whether it’s the bone or the muscles, I don’t know. I think the muscles myself. I’ve had this for a few months.

Now I have a dead feeling in my toes of my right leg. In addition – for two weeks – also my heel and side of my foot. Since today also the side of my lower leg and thigh. Can this be the result of a pinched nerve in my back and does this go away on its own or is it necessary to consult the doctor?”

Sylvie

Mark Chen, physical therapist:

Hello Sylvie,

Of course, your complaints may be the result of nerve irritation, but in most cases, nerve problems are very obvious!

Nerves are responsible for very sharp, recognizable, almost “lightning-like” sensations. Other nerve-related pain, such as toothache, is characterized as a constant nagging pain that can be so strong that it is difficult to focus on anything else.

It may also be that the problem is muscle related. Sometimes problems in the muscles can cause radiating feelings to other places in the body.

By applying pressure to the designated areas in the muscles, the signals can sometimes be generated in the radiation area. You can try this with your fingers, but it is usually easier to use a tennis ball or another hard ball for this. If there is a clear link between the pressing of the muscle and the sensations in the known area, then there is a high chance that it is a muscle related problem. That is a good sign because muscle problems are generally a lot easier to solve than nerve problems.

If this were not the case, the most logical step would be to go to a therapist for a diagnostic examination. He/she can then give you a good idea of what is going on, and otherwise, you can be referred for a scan.

I hope this helps.

Mark

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