Hi there #KetoCorporal .

If you’re reading this, you’ve probably come from step two of the Keto Diet Guide.

*If not, please go here first. It’s important before moving on.

Shopping Assignment “Preparation is key”

Goal: Making sure you have the right foods to eat

The Why:

If you only have Ketogenic foods, chances of you reaching out to something out of habit, or “not having anything Keto” is extremely diminished.

What do to: 

Go Shopping! Use the list below to get enough foods for the entire week. Don’t worry about recipes too much yet. As long as you have the right items, we’re good.

I’d say the following are eggssential 😉

  • eggs
  • bacon
  • ham
  • cheese
  • milk
  • full fat cream
  • lettuce
  • broccoli
  • garlic
  • onion
  • cooking cream
  • butter (grass fed)
  • tomatoes
  • almonds

Let me know what you bought with a photo of your bought items on the Facebook Page

By the way, have you checked out the Patreon Page? There are Daily workout challenges over there for just 1$ per month, while supporting a person in need. Come check it out

 

 

And when you’re ready to move on and learn about how to make your morning coffee Keto and awesome, click here

If you’re reading this, you’ve probably come from step one of the Keto Diet Guide.

*If not, please go here first. It’s important before moving on

Assignment: Elimination

 

Goal: Target and Eliminate all Carbs

The Why:

The point of the Keto Diet is getting into a “Ketogenic State”. A situation in which the body is forced to use fat is a primary and only use of fuel.

What do to: 

I need you to go into the fridge and make note of everything you can not eat during the Ketogenic diet. Look for products like the following

  • Bread
  • Rice
  • Grains
  • Pasta
  • Fruit*
  • Juices/Soda’s

All of these (and many more) are heavy carbohydrate-based and will need to be completely eliminated before attempting the diet.

Choose to either discard of it all / give it away / eat it before starting the diet.

 

Let me know your decision below in the comment box or on the Facebook Page

By the way, the page has a bunch of free workouts also, so keep up to date by liking it!

 

Ready to continue? Click here for the next assignment

knee pain fixed

“I am 64 years old and heard a ‘crack’ in my knee when my upper body turned to the left. My knee stopped and locked. I’m worried that I may have torn my meniscus, or maybe my cruciate ligament.  I read on the internet that surgery is not done beyond a certain age. Is this correct? Which exercises do you recommend to have my thigh muscles take over the function of the cruciate ligament?”

The diagnosis has not yet been made, this is based on my own assumption. I lead a quiet life without sport, but I do cycle.

What should I do with a torn meniscus? My outer meniscus was removed forty years ago.”

Sent by: Ineke

Mark Chen,  Physiotherapist:

Whether or not the operation is done depends more on the general health and functioning of the knee rather than on age. In order to know this for sure, you could briefly consult with the GP or the orthopedic surgeon, or who would be the designated person to perform any procedure.

You indicate that the diagnosis has not yet been made. It seems like a good idea to at least have the knee examined by a specialist and have the cruciate ligament tested. If they turn out positive then there is a considerable chance that there is actually a tear. In the case of a “crack” or a hairline tear, an intervention is probably not necessary.

The cruciate ligaments are mainly needed for fast movements and when we change direction. Think for example of tennis or football. When cycling and walking cover the largest part of your exercise activities, there is a big chance that you can continue to function completely without problems, even without a cruciate ligament.

I recommend visiting the physiotherapist to at least have the knee examined. He/she can immediately give exercises to strengthen the knee if necessary.

I hope this helps!

 

 

Ps. we have a team of experts that can help out with almost any questions related to health and fitness. Have a question? Send it in!

https://www.gezondheidsnet.nl/experts

 

Neck Pain

I just got operated for a herniated disc between the 6th and 7th vertebra along the back of the neck. A part has been removed. I had a nerve failure in my left arm because the nerve was compressed by the herniation. Now I have one problem; I walked 2 or 3 times a week for 1 hour but according to the doctor that is not very good for my neck because I have osteoarthritis between my 5th and 6th cervical vertebrae (strongly narrowed intervertebral space with slight disc herniation) and the other cervical vertebrae have small disc protrusions)

My question now is whether it is wise to buy a cross trainer and to maintain my fitness level that way. I mainly did fat burning and endurance.

I am 50 years old and still want to be active and have no overweight bmi = 21

Christine

 

 

Mark Chen, Physiotherapist:

 

Hi Christine,

I think it is certainly a good idea to keep the condition up to date via a cross trainer. I would certainly also put the advice of the GP to the test.
The idea that osteoarthritis should be a reason to be careful is very old-fashioned. To get an idea of what I mean, take a look at the next image.

 

Recent scientific research has tested the causal relationship between abnormal findings and pain by allowing people to take an MRI scan without any symptoms.
These studies show that there are a huge percentage of deviations that in these cases are totally unpaired with pain.
For example, for a disc “bulging” as you describe, 87% !!!
For degenerative changes of the discus, such as dehydration/desiccation, as many as 96%!!! of the older population.
This group, again, does not experience any pain.

This should be a reassurance. The findings in your neck are normal, and not necessarily responsible for any pain.
Of course, from my position I can, not determine whether there is actually a connection!

My advice would be to find a sporty physiotherapist who can help with this process. The neck must be tested slowly to see what is and is not possible!

In this way you will probably be surprised at what is possible. The idea to reduce a basic activity such as walking at such a young age (provided there is a good reason) does not seem sensible to me.

I hope this helps!

Mark Chen

“I suffer from a bursitis in my shoulder. Now I have heard that an injection does not always work. Can I benefit from physiotherapy?”

-Astrid

Mark Chen, Physiotherapist

How annoying that you have bursitis: They can, especially in the shoulder, be very persistent.

Injections are an often used treatment for bursitis and other inflammatory issues. The results are variable, but generally very good. With such an injection, corticosteroids are injected into the joint, with the intention of reaching the bursa, or whichever structure is the problem. A good placement of the injection is, therefore, very important.

The cortisone that is used is a variant of a hormone that the body itself makes to combat inflammation. When cortisone is administered from the outside, the immune system is suppressed and the body temporarily stops with production. In the short term, so with a single injection, that is generally not a problem. But the use of cortisone in the long term can have adverse effects, such as atrophy (decrease) of muscle tissue, decrease in bone quality and susceptibility to infections.

Physiotherapy

If you opt for treatment by a physiotherapist, you will probably look at the underlying cause. When the bursitis in your shoulder is not caused by a trauma, there is often a reason to find in the mechanics of the shoulder, posture or behavior. You can identify and solve these types of causes together with a therapist. In many cases, an injection is not required.

I myself always advise people to take a close look at the immune system. Are there ways, for example in your diet, to support the body in its own abilities to heal? When the shoulder is relieved, the body is well hydrated and provided with sufficient building materials, then you are often perfectly able to solve an inflammation by yourself.

Of course, one does not have to exclude the other. The physical therapist can inform you if and when it is wise to choose an injection.

 

Hope this helps!

 

-Mark Chen

I have lost cartilage in my knee and a little bit in the hips, can I still do spinning? I’ve been doing it for years.

-Diny

Mark Chen, physiotherapist

The advantage of spinning is that it is not a weight-bearing activity (except the standing parts , of course). That makes it a ‘safer’ option than, for example, running, in which your knees and hips have to endure huge impact for miles. So if you look at it purely from a mechanical perspective, no problem at all.

You indicate that you have been doing spinning for years.

Could it be that the amount of years and intensity have contributed to the amount of wear?
Ultimately, spinning is  a very one-dimensional and repetitive form of sport. Do you clearly have more issues immediately after spinning, or the morning after? In that case you can question how beneficial spinning is for your body.

I am personally in favor of variety, not only because I like to do different things myself but also not to stress my body too much in one way. I also recommend this to the majority of my clients. Ask yourself the above questions and if spinning does indeed cause issues to you, then consider reducing or varying with a different sport.

 

Mark Chen

Physiotherapist / Personal Trainer / Nutritionist

 

Four things to consider when you’re trying to make sense of never-ending contradicting pieces of health information:

1. The History

2. The Context

3. The Mechanism

4. The Short Term vs. Long Term

Using these points, the video gives some quick examples of how this can be applied to different nutrition information, but the reoccurring example for medications is antidepressants.

 

 

▲Patreon: https://www.patreon.com/WILearned

I got a lot of backlash from the Tess Holiday post I did this week. Even though the initial post said “This cover can be called controversial”, which is obviously is looking at all the discussion that followed, I instantly felt regret posting it.

The conversations that followed were intense. There was no, or very limited, intellectual debate. Instead, there was a lot of attacking, generalizing, taking things out of context, and projecting of some of my friends’ own problems on the issue.

As Corbett mentioned correctly, Facebook is not the place to have this discussion. However, there are some points that I’d still like to make and there are some things that I should rectify. (And thank you, Rachel, for bringing this to my attention).

My problems with the Tess Holiday issue:

  • My problem is not with Tess itself. Even though I do believe that she is not sincere. I know many overweight people that do, in fact, embrace their heavier frame and they are okay with that and I believe and respect that. They also do not celebrate or promote their weight, and they definitely don’t tell me or other people to quote “Kiss their fat ass”. Tess pretends to fully embrace her weight and pretends to be proud of “who she is and how she is”, but at the same time, she is on a Cosmopolitan cover wearing make-up and heavily photoshopped. The hypocrisy here is flat-out annoying to me and it’s a big part why I simply do not buy into the facade.
  • Obesity should not be promoted or embraced. I’m just baffled by how I need to explain to people that the being morbidly obese is a disease. It’s affecting the quality of life, decreases lifespan, affects people around them and costs an INSANE amount of money, and this is in the states alone. And this is 100% preventable.

What I should have added:

  • I’m all for accepting a wider view of what’s “normal” when it comes to beauty standards. I don’t think that our former standard with overly skinny catwalk models was healthy at all. Maybe I should have stated this but haven’t we long passed this idea?
  • Rachel brought up to me that I could be sending out the wrong signal and brought Ashley Graham to my attention. I’ve looked into her and I think she is the perfect example of what being a plus sized model that can also still portray a healthy lifestyle.

 

My view on the Cosmopolitan issue stands. I think they’ve pushed the narrative too far to the extreme by putting Tess on the cover. Being overweight to the point of killing yourself from the inside is not something that should be glorified. Instead, attention should be more towards women like Ashley Graham that can demonstrate self-acceptance, health and a couple of pounds more.

 

Always appreciate thoughtful discussion,

 

Mark